Categories
News Publication

New SPLICE Paper on Recurring Device Verification

The most common forms of authentication are passwords, potentially used in combination with a second factor such as a hardware token or mobile app (i.e., two-factor authentication). These approaches emphasize a one-time, initial authentication. Recent work has explored how to provide passive, continuous authentication and/or automatic de-authentication by correlating user movements and inputs with actions observed in an application (e.g., a web browser). The issue with indefinite trust goes beyond user authentication; consider devices that pair via Bluetooth.

The increased adoption of IoT devices and reports of inadequacy of their security makes indefinite trust of devices problematic. The reality of ubiquitous connectivity and frequent mobility gives rise to a myriad of opportunities for devices to be compromised. Thus, we argue that one-time, single-factor, device-to-device authentication (i.e., an initial pairing) is not enough, and that there must exist some mechanism to frequently (re-)verify the authenticity of devices and their connections.

In this paper we propose a device-to-device recurring authentication scheme – Verification of Interaction Authenticity (VIA) – that is based on evaluating characteristics of the communications (interactions) between devices. We adapt techniques from wireless traffic analysis and intrusion detection systems to develop behavioral models that capture typical, authentic device interactions (behavior); these models enable recurring verification of device behavior. 

To read more, check out the paper here.

Travis Peters, Timothy J. Pierson, Sougata Sen, José Camacho, and David Kotz. Recurring Verification of Interaction Authenticity Within Bluetooth Networks. Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Security and Privacy in Wireless and Mobile Networks (WiSec 2021), pages 192–203. ACM, June 2021. doi:10.1145/3448300.3468287. ©

Categories
News

Morgan State featured on NSA website

If you’re in the market for a new car, you’ve probably noticed two things recently. The first being that almost all new cars today have electronic components for even the most basic of functionalities. The second being that because cars have these functionalities that require semiconductors (small chips “that manage functions like data storage, graphic rendering, and power consumption in electrical devices”), the recent semiconductor shortage is keeping many new cars on the lots.

If you end up buying that new car (or a relatively new, used car), you will be buying both a transportation and data collection system. “The data collected and recorded is quite broad and includes vehicle speed, passenger count, GPS routes, images from backup cameras, and [personally identifiable information] from connected cell phones. This information stays locally on the vehicle forever and in most cases is uploaded to the [original equipment manufacturer]. Those systems also control critical safety items like brakes. If left unprotected both privacy and lives could be at risk,” says Brian Knighton from the National Security Agency.

That’s where Morgan State comes in. Morgan State University Professor and SPLICE PI, Kevin Kornegay, and his team at the Cybersecurity Assurance and Policy (CAP) Center are working with the NSA’s reverse-engineering tool, Ghidra, to mitigate privacy, cybersecurity, malware, and geolocation vulnerabilities. Their work ensures that the electronic systems are supported and protected throughout the lifetime of the vehicle. Follow the links to learn more about the CAP Center and to read about their partnership with the NSA.

Dr. Kevin Kornegay (front) and Aaron Edmond review Ghidra firmware analysis. (Photo courtesy of Morgan State University)

Categories
News Video

David Kotz speaks on Smart Devices

Did you receive a smart device this holiday season, and leave it sitting in the box because you don’t know how to set it up? Or were you one of those savvy shoppers who bought a smart device on clearance after the holiday rush and already have the perfect place to put it in your home?

Either way, SPLICE PI David Kotz has some advice for keeping your information secure and private when using smart devices. Check it what he has to say in the video!

Categories
News Patents Publication

New SPLICE Patent

The SPLICE team is pleased to announce one new patent derived from research conducted by SPLICE Principal Investigator Kevin Kornegay and Professor Willie Thompson, both from Morgan State University. The patent describes a data traffic module supporting the attestation and secure boot operations of IoT devices and legacy computing devices, and providing tamper resistance to such devices. 

Kevin Kornegay and Willie Lee Thompson II. Decentralized Root-of-Trust Framework for Heterogeneous Networks, November 2020. Morgan State University; USPTO. Download from https://patents.google.com/patent/US20180196945A1/en